The cities of the future could be built by microbes

Martyn Dade-Robertson, Newcastle University You might be disappointed to hear that some intriguing underwater structures recently discovered off the Greek island of Zakynthos are not part of the lost city of Atlantis. But the structures, which resemble colonnades of cobble Continue reading The cities of the future could be built by microbes

Sustainable cement: the simple switch that could massively cut global carbon emissions

Brant Walkley, University of Sheffield August 22 is Earth Overshoot Day, which marks the date when humanity’s demand for ecological resources in a given year exceeds what Earth can regenerate in that year. This results from massive consumption of ecological Continue reading Sustainable cement: the simple switch that could massively cut global carbon emissions

Calling recent human history ‘Anthropocene’ won’t help us solve the problems we face

Tony Brown, University of Southampton Just over ten years ago the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric scientist Paul Crutzen coined the term “Anthropocene” for a globe totally transformed and dominated by humans, a state he suggested we were in now. Although this Continue reading Calling recent human history ‘Anthropocene’ won’t help us solve the problems we face

How climate change caused the world’s first ever empire to collapse

Vasile Ersek, Northumbria University, Newcastle Gol-e-Zard Cave lies in the shadow of Mount Damavand, which at more than 5,000 metres dominates the landscape of northern Iran. In this cave, stalagmites and stalactites are growing slowly over millennia and preserve in Continue reading How climate change caused the world’s first ever empire to collapse

Plastic is now part of our planet’s fabric – a scientist and archaeologist discuss what happens next

Sharon George, Keele University and Matt Edgeworth, University of Leicester This is an article from Head to Head, a series in which academics from different disciplines chew over current debates. Let us know what else you’d like covered – all Continue reading Plastic is now part of our planet’s fabric – a scientist and archaeologist discuss what happens next

Virtual reality can bring ancient cities back to life and improve conservation

Tarek Teba, University of Portsmouth Around 3,300 years ago, the port city of Ugarit was a vibrant urban centre, located strategically on the overland network linking Egypt with Asia Minor and on the route between Persia and India in the Continue reading Virtual reality can bring ancient cities back to life and improve conservation

Recreating medieval towns – an example of why Minecraft is a great learning tool

Joel Mills, University of Hull I recently told a room full of academics interested in using videogames as a teaching tool that “to play is the biggest freedom we can have as a child, or as an adult”. The popular Continue reading Recreating medieval towns – an example of why Minecraft is a great learning tool

Humans have a long history of coming together to solve a climate crisis

Ian Hall, Cardiff University Responding to a crisis often brings out the best in people. Certainly it has in the past, when sudden changes in climate during the Middle Stone Age sparked off surges of cultural evolution and innovation in Continue reading Humans have a long history of coming together to solve a climate crisis

Virtual archaeology: how we achieved the first long-distance reconstruction of a cultural artefact

Sandra Woolley, Keele University; Erlend Gehlken, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main; Eugene Ch’ng, University of Nottingham, and Tim Collins, Manchester Metropolitan University The epic of Atrahasis is one of the most significant pieces of ancient Babylonian literature. It describes a Continue reading Virtual archaeology: how we achieved the first long-distance reconstruction of a cultural artefact