How climate change caused the world’s first ever empire to collapse

Vasile Ersek, Northumbria University, Newcastle Gol-e-Zard Cave lies in the shadow of Mount Damavand, which at more than 5,000 metres dominates the landscape of northern Iran. In this cave, stalagmites and stalactites are growing slowly over millennia and preserve in Continue reading How climate change caused the world’s first ever empire to collapse

Virtual reality can bring ancient cities back to life and improve conservation

Tarek Teba, University of Portsmouth Around 3,300 years ago, the port city of Ugarit was a vibrant urban centre, located strategically on the overland network linking Egypt with Asia Minor and on the route between Persia and India in the Continue reading Virtual reality can bring ancient cities back to life and improve conservation

Recreating medieval towns – an example of why Minecraft is a great learning tool

Joel Mills, University of Hull I recently told a room full of academics interested in using videogames as a teaching tool that “to play is the biggest freedom we can have as a child, or as an adult”. The popular Continue reading Recreating medieval towns – an example of why Minecraft is a great learning tool

Humans have a long history of coming together to solve a climate crisis

Ian Hall, Cardiff University Responding to a crisis often brings out the best in people. Certainly it has in the past, when sudden changes in climate during the Middle Stone Age sparked off surges of cultural evolution and innovation in Continue reading Humans have a long history of coming together to solve a climate crisis

Virtual archaeology: how we achieved the first long-distance reconstruction of a cultural artefact

Sandra Woolley, Keele University; Erlend Gehlken, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main; Eugene Ch’ng, University of Nottingham, and Tim Collins, Manchester Metropolitan University The epic of Atrahasis is one of the most significant pieces of ancient Babylonian literature. It describes a Continue reading Virtual archaeology: how we achieved the first long-distance reconstruction of a cultural artefact

How virtual reality is opening up some of the world’s most inaccessible archaeological sites

Brendan Cassidy, University of Central Lancashire and David Robinson, University of Central Lancashire We often associate virtual reality (VR) with thrilling experiences we may never be able to have in real life – such as flying a jet fighter, exploring Continue reading How virtual reality is opening up some of the world’s most inaccessible archaeological sites

Environmental change could be damaging some of the world’s most precious archaeology

Kirsty High, University of York and Kirsty Penkman, University of York Star Carr in North Yorkshire is perhaps the most important archaeological site in the UK relating to the Mesolithic period from the end of the last ice age. Archaeologists Continue reading Environmental change could be damaging some of the world’s most precious archaeology